Wednesday, 26 April 2017

AI report fed by DeepMind, Amazon, Uber urges greater access to public sector data sets | TechCrunch

AI report fed by DeepMind, Amazon, Uber urges greater access to public sector data sets | TechCrunch: "Ultimately, the report does call for “urgent consideration” to be given to what it describes as “the ‘careful stewardship’ needed over the next ten years to ensure that the dividends from machine learning… benefit all in UK society.” And it’s true to say, as we’ve said before, that policymakers and regulators do need to step up and start building frameworks and determining rules to ensure machine learning technologists do not have the chance to asset strip the public sector’s crown jewels before they’ve even been valued (not to mention leave future citizens unable to pay for the fancy services that will then be sold back to them, powered by machine learning models freely fatted up on publicly funded data).

 But the suggested 10-year time frame seems disingenuous, to put it mildly. With — for instance — very large quantities of sensitive NHS data already flowing from the public sector into the hands of one of the world’s most market capitalized companies (Alphabet/Google/DeepMind) there would seem to be rather more short-term urgency for policymakers to address this issue — not leave it on the back burner for a decade or so. Indeed, parliamentarians have already been urging action on AI-related concerns like algorithmic accountability." 'via Blog this'

Tuesday, 25 April 2017

These internet firsts will remind you how far we've come - Business Insider

These internet firsts will remind you how far we've come - Business Insider: "In October 1969, UCLA student Charley Kline was attempting to send the word “login” over to the Stanford Research Institute using the internet’s precursor: ARPANET.

At first, the system crashed, only managing to send the letters “i” and “o”. But an hour or so later, the full message was successfully sent and history was made:" 'via Blog this'

Monday, 24 April 2017

SCL: European Net Neutrality, at last?

SCL: European Net Neutrality, at last?Luca Belli and Chris Marsden review the long history of developments, and the latest position, on net neutrality in Europe, amid some hopeful signs. 

Net neutrality is the principle mandating that internet traffic be managed in a non-discriminatory fashion, in order to fully safeguard internet users' rights. On 30 August 2016, all EU and EEA members finally obtained guidance on how to implement sound net neutrality provisions. The path has been tortuous and uneasy, starting from 'not neutrality', reaching an open Internet compromise and, finally, attaining net neutrality protections. In this article, we aim briefly to recount how net neutrality evolved in Europe and how much significant progress has been made by the recently adopted net neutrality Guidelines. 'via Blog this'

Saturday, 15 April 2017

The Low-Down: Streaming Now Makes Most of the US Music Industry's Revenue

The Low-Down: Streaming Now Makes Most of the US Music Industry's Revenue: "Overall last year, retail revenues from recorded music in the US grew 11.4 percent to $7.7 billion, the biggest gain since 1998, according to the RIAA. Even with such growth the industry is still licking its wounds from the last decade and a half -- sales remain about half what they were in 1999, the heyday of the CD.
Subscriptions, like the monthly fees for Apple Music or Spotify's paid tier, were the biggest money maker at $2.3 billion, and they basically doubled from a year earlier, the RIAA said." 'via Blog this'

Thursday, 13 April 2017

FCA Publishes Discussion Paper on the Regulation of DLT (blockchains)

FCA Publishes Discussion Paper on the Regulation of DLT: "The FCA continues its ‘wait-and-see’ approach before considering changes to its framework. It will instead explore emerging business models and continue to help innovators test-bed solutions in its regulatory sandbox.

 The FCA remains technology neutral/ agnostic but it is encouraging to note its approach to resilience and openness to regulating on technology outcomes, in line with statutory objectives.

The paper also recognises that DLT is not a panacea and that market outcomes like faster payments could be delivered by other technologies. It is indicative however of an increasingly mature approach to technology risk and the paper does recognise DLT’s innovative potential for record-keeping and efficiency.

 With a voluntary standards process also underway and increasing regulatory accommodation, end-users will be more accepting of the increasing trust that DLT affords, allowing benefits around efficiency, transparency and provenance to be fully realised. This much is very encouraging for UK DLT and cements the UK’s position as a global fintech hub with a forward-looking regulatory regime." 'via Blog this'

Wednesday, 12 April 2017

Where to after Watson: The challenges and future of data retention in the UK (BIICL)

Where to after Watson: The challenges and future of data retention in the UK (BIICL): "The judgment of the CJEU in the Watson case was handed down shortly before the year's end in 2016. The determination that member states may not impose on communications providers a general obligation to retain data was applauded by privacy groups and has undoubtedly caused disquiet among those involved policing and intelligence. What parliamentarians and judges will make of it in the coming months - and, post-Brexit, years - is both uncertain and important.

In this event experts will examine the strengths, weakness and implication of the decision, with an eye to rights protections, the need to combat serious crime, and the practicalities of managing both in light of the European Court's decision." 'via Blog this'

Monday, 10 April 2017

Balkinization: Assessing Algorithmic Authority

Balkinization: Assessing Algorithmic Authority: "Compared to these examples, the obscurity at the heart of our "cultural voting machines" (as I call dominant intermediaries) may seem trivial. But when a private entity grows important enough, its own secret laws deserve at least some scrutiny.

 I have little faith that such scrutiny will come any time soon. But until it does, we should not forget that the success of algorithmic authorities depends in large part on their owners' ability to convince us of the importance--not merely the accuracy--of their results. A society that obsesses over the top Google News results has made those results important, and we are ill-advised to assume the reverse (that the results are obsessed over because they are important) without some narrative account of why the algorithm is superior to, say, the “news judgment” of editors at traditional media.

(Algorithmic authority may simply be a way of rewarding engineers (rather than media personalities) for amusing ourselves to death.) " 'via Blog this'