Tuesday, 13 June 2017

Two leading ladies of Europe warn that internet regulation is coming • The Register

Two leading ladies of Europe warn that internet regulation is coming • The Register: "Merkel has been pushing for a Europe-wide series of laws and rules to clamp down on such content. Over the weekend, she used her speech in Mexico to argue for global restrictions.

"We still have no international rules," she said, standing next to Mexican president Enrique Peña Nieto, warning that standards have been introduced erratically across the globe.

She spoke in favor of "sensible rules" and said that Germany would use its presidency of the G20 to develop a concrete set of digital policies at the forthcoming summit in Hamburg next month.

She drew parallels with a G20 agreement to deal with cyber attacks on the global banking system, and noted that Europe and the United States need to work together on new common standards." 'via Blog this'

Thursday, 1 June 2017

SCL: SCL Student Essay Prize 2017 Winner

SCL: SCL Student Essay Prize 2017 Winner: "Lottie is in her final (4th) year studying for a Law with European Legal Systems degree at the University of East Anglia. She is very interested in international security, counter-terrorism, technology and the law, and will be looking for a career path in this direction.

The two runners-up, Daniel Zwi and Ella Castle, both addressed the set question concerning the CJEU’s Mc Fadden judgment. Their
essays will be published on the SCL website." 'via Blog this'

Saturday, 27 May 2017

Bank of Canada says won't use blockchain for interbank payment system By Reuters

Bank of Canada says won't use blockchain for interbank payment system By Reuters: ""The bottom line is that a stand-alone DLT wholesale system is unlikely to match the efficiency and net benefits of a centralized system," wrote Carolyn Wilkins, senior deputy governor of the Bank of Canada, and Gerry Gaetz, Payments Canada president.
"At its heart, there exists a fundamental inconsistency or tension between a centralized wholesale interbank payment system, as we have now, and the decentralization inherent in DLT."" 'via Blog this'

Thursday, 25 May 2017

Audiovisual Media Services Directive reform: Document pool - EDRi

Audiovisual Media Services Directive reform: Document pool - EDRi: "On 25 May 2016, the European Commission proposed to reform the Audiovisual Media Services Directive (the “AVMS Directive” or “AVMSD”). The current AVMS Directive (2010) is the European Union (EU) legal framework that regulates traditional TV broadcasters and on-demand services in the EU Member States.

The AVMSD contains rules on audiovisual advertising; jurisdiction over providers; promotion of European works; and on providers’ obligations with regards to commercial communications, protection of minors from potentially harmful content, fight against “incitement to hatred”, among other measures. The new proposal broadens the scope of the Directive to cover the regulation of video-sharing platforms and potentially even other social media companies." 'via Blog this'

Cyberleagle: Time to speak up for Article 15

Cyberleagle: Time to speak up for Article 15: "The peculiar vice of compelled general monitoring, however, is that we never get to that point. If the filtered and blocked speech doesn’t see the light of day it never gets to be debated, prosecuted, tested, criticised or defended. To some, that may be a virtue not a vice" 'via Blog this'

SCL: Res Robotica! Liability and Driverless Vehicles

SCL: Res Robotica! Liability and Driverless Vehicles: "English lawyer Andrew Katz[17] suggests that robotic technology could be given an authenticated identity through the use of a trust scheme, one that is not mandatory, but failure to be party to it would render the owner of the technology strictly liable for its actions or omissions. As with Pagallo, Katz suggests that the peculium should be backed by an insurance policy.

Introducing the idea of a peculium linked to insurance could provide the legal flexibility required to accommodate the evolving technology[18] and tackling the problem of apportioning blame to a traditional legal person." 'via Blog this'

Sunday, 14 May 2017

Open Rights Group - NHS ransom shows GCHQ putting us at risk

Open Rights Group - NHS ransom shows GCHQ putting us at risk: "GCHQ are normally responsible for ‘offensive’ operations, or hacking and breaking into other networks. They also have a ‘defensive’ role, at the National Cyber Security Centre, which is meant to help organisations like the NHS keep their systems safe from these kinds of breakdown.

GCHQ are therefore forced to trade off their use of secret hacking exploits against the risks these exploits pose to organisations like the NHS.

They have a tremendous conflict of interest, which in ORG’s view, ought to be resolved by moving the UK defensive role out of GCHQ’s hands.

Government also needs to have a robust means of assessing the risks that GCHQ’s use of vulnerabilities might pose to the rest of us. At the moment, ministers can only turn to GCHQ to ask about the risks, and we assume the same is true in practice of oversight bodies and future Surveillance Commissioners. The obvious way to improve this and get more independent advice is to split National Cyber Security Centre from GCHQ." 'via Blog this'